top ten tuesday

5 Books That Should Be Adapted to a Series (Or a Movie) | #TopTenTuesday 252

A lot of books are being adapted into a series or a movie. Just recently Eleanor and Park was clearly announced.  There is a lot of talk about this because this book is about a Korean mc and the author is white. (And let us not forget about all the racist elements the book has going for it).

So for today’s Top Ten Tuesday (as always hosted by That Artsy Reader Girl) we are talking about books that should be adapted and I thought I would share some books by POC creators I think should be adapted instead of books like Eleanor and Park, where the rep is questionable at best.

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The Poet X by Elizabeth Acevedo

Xiomara Batista feels unheard and unable to hide in her Harlem neighborhood. Ever since her body grew into curves, she has learned to let her fists and her fierceness do the talking.
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But Xiomara has plenty she wants to say, and she pours all her frustration and passion onto the pages of a leather notebook, reciting the words to herself like prayers—especially after she catches feelings for a boy in her bio class named Aman, who her family can never know about. With Mami’s determination to force her daughter to obey the laws of the church, Xiomara understands that her thoughts are best kept to herself.
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So when she is invited to join her school’s slam poetry club, she doesn’t know how she could ever attend without her mami finding out, much less speak her words out loud. But still, she can’t stop thinking about performing her poems.
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Because in the face of a world that may not want to hear her, Xiomara refuses to be silent.

The Poet X is an incredible book that brings forward slam poetry in a way that even grabbed me. It would be amazing to see this all play out on the screen. And Xiomora is such a great character. I fell in love with her. And it has to be amazing to see Xiomora on the screen for those that are like her.

Sorcerer to the Crown by Zen Cho

At his wit’s end, Zacharias Wythe, freed slave, eminently proficient magician, and Sorcerer Royal of the Unnatural Philosophers—one of the most respected organizations throughout all of Britain—ventures to the border of Fairyland to discover why England’s magical stocks are drying up.
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But when his adventure brings him in contact with a most unusual comrade, a woman with immense power and an unfathomable gift, he sets on a path which will alter the nature of sorcery in all of Britain—and the world at large…

Zacharias and Prunella kick ass in a predominantly white male sorcerer world in London and it deserves to be seen.

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Mexican Gothic by Silvia Moreno-Garcia

After receiving a frantic letter from her newly wed cousin begging for someone to save her from a mysterious doom, Noemí Taboada heads to High Place, a distant house in the Mexican countryside. She’s not sure what she will find—her cousin’s husband, a handsome Englishman, is a stranger, and Noemí knows little about the region.
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Noemí is also an unlikely rescuer: She’s a glamorous debutante, and her chic gowns and perfect red lipstick are more suited for cocktail parties than amateur sleuthing. But she’s also tough and smart, with an indomitable will, and she is not afraid: Not of her cousin’s new husband, who is both menacing and alluring; not of his father, the ancient patriarch who seems to be fascinated by Noemí; and not even of the house itself, which begins to invade Noemi’s dreams with visions of blood and doom.
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Her only ally in this inhospitable abode is the family’s youngest son. Shy and gentle, he seems to want to help Noemí, but might also be hiding dark knowledge of his family’s past. For there are many secrets behind the walls of High Place. The family’s once colossal wealth and faded mining empire kept them from prying eyes, but as Noemí digs deeper she unearths stories of violence and madness. And Noemí, mesmerized by the terrifying yet seductive world of High Place, may soon find it impossible to ever leave this enigmatic house behind.

Mexican Gothic is a great historical horror with a twinge of magic that we deserve to see on the the screen and come to life.

Tristan Strong Punches a Hole in the Sky by Kwame Mbalia

Seventh-grader Tristan Strong feels anything but strong ever since he failed to save his best friend when they were in a bus accident together. All he has left of Eddie is the journal his friend wrote stories in. Tristan is dreading the month he’s going to spend on his grandparents’ farm in Alabama, where he’s being sent to heal from the tragedy. But on his first night there, a sticky creature shows up in his bedroom and steals Eddie’s journal. Tristan chases after it — is that a doll? — and a tug-of-war ensues between them underneath a Bottle Tree. In a last attempt to wrestle the journal out of the creature’s hands, Tristan punches the tree, accidentally ripping open a chasm into the MidPass, a volatile place with a burning sea, haunted bone ships, and iron monsters that are hunting the inhabitants of this world. Tristan finds himself in the middle of a battle that has left black American gods John Henry and Brer Rabbit exhausted. In order to get back home, Tristan and these new allies will need to entice the god Anansi, the Weaver, to come out of hiding and seal the hole in the sky. But bartering with the trickster Anansi always comes at a price. Can Tristan save this world before he loses more of the things he loves?

We deserve a new hero!

Jade City by Fonda Lee

The Kaul family is one of two crime syndicates that control the island of Kekon. It’s the only place in the world that produces rare magical jade, which grants those with the right training and heritage superhuman abilities.
The Green Bone clans of honorable jade-wearing warriors once protected the island from foreign invasion–but nowadays, in a bustling post-war metropolis full of fast cars and foreign money, Green Bone families like the Kauls are primarily involved in commerce, construction, and the everyday upkeep of the districts under their protection.
When the simmering tension between the Kauls and their greatest rivals erupts into open violence in the streets, the outcome of this clan war will determine the fate of all Green Bones and the future of Kekon itself.

This whole series is amazing and there is so much to discover for a tv show.

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14 thoughts on “5 Books That Should Be Adapted to a Series (Or a Movie) | #TopTenTuesday 252

  1. Great list! I think Mexican Gothic is being adapted, which is exciting. 🙂 I haven’t even read Jade City yet and even I agree that it sounds like it would be a fantastic series. (Also ew to Eleanor & Park–I have no interest in the book or the adaptation.)

    Liked by 1 person

  2. YESSS! I didn’t think about The Poet X but yess it would be amazing to watch it in movie format! Mexican Gothic and Jace City are 2 books I can’t wait to read!

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Ooh yes, The Poet X would be an amazing movie! I’ve got Tristan Strong, Mexican Gothic and Jade City on my TBR and I can’t wait to read them and I’ll probs now end up thinking about them as shows/movies too lol Great list!

    Liked by 1 person

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